Pirep on Lycoming Case Leak Repair Technique

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  • Pirep on Lycoming Case Leak Repair Technique

    Folks,

    As recommended by Ed Kollin of Camguard, and further amplified by CFO member Vince Endter who learned of this technique during his recent Lycoming engine school in Williamsport, we put a vacuum on the case via an industrial vacuum duct-taped to the oil filler tube.

    We then removed the case-half bolts along the spine of the engine where we had a BAD oil leak (1/2 quart per hour). Then, the area, including the bolt holes and along the spine, were cleaned with MEK to get rid of any oil.

    We then used kind-of-pricey Loctite 290 to seal the area. Applying the Loctite to the spine, we could see it wicking down past the open bolt holes. We made roughly three passes with the Loctite, then turned off the vacuum cleaner. We then reinstalled the hardware, and left the plane to sit overnight.

    On ground run up, and now after a dozen hours or so of flight operation, the entire area is as dry as a new engine. Amazingly good results! Thank you Ed, Vince, and Lycoming for letting us know about this new technique... we were really surprised by how well it worked!

    I'll keep you advised as time progresses, but for now, I'm going flying!

    Paul

    Pirep on Lycoming Case Leak Repair Technique

  • #2
    Wow!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by John O'Shaughnessy [FCM
      ;n488]Wow!
      Still dry, but now we’re changing a cylinder... see if we screw it up!

      Paul

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      • #4
        It would appear that your technique sucks...;-)

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        • #5
          I was wondering if some of the locktite could get into an oil passage, or did none of it go all the way through the seam?

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          • #6
            Great info. I am forwarding this to my A&P who is working on someone else's Lycoming with this problem.

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