Unnecessary OverWater

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  • Unnecessary OverWater

    Sitting and paying bills today at the computer (;-( ), I was watching traffic in and out of HPN on a rather bumpy but 6-800 foot ceiling kind of day. The heavy rain of earlier has cleared out, no peals of thunder since about 7:30AM.

    What caught my eye was a light single taking the so-called Shark Route (V139) from SIE VOR in southern NJ off the Atlantic coast to RICED (nearing the HTO VOR on Eastern Long Island), as a way to get to HPN. It did this at 9,000' - 7,000', I assume rather than flying at 5,000' up V1 to DIXIE, then V276 RBV V249 SAX V39 DIXIE (the west route over land).

    Seems an odd choice....the overland route is 25 nm (12% shorter) (200 nm versus 175 nm), and there wasn't any wx in the way (it had to fly through moderate rain on the over water route). And, the water temperature at a buoy near the off-shore route is 48.4dF.

    Maybe the a/c is outfitted with a raft, I don't know. And, I'll do over Lake Michigan in the summer at 16,000' or so, limiting being out of gliding distance to about 10 mins., rather than go south of Chicago to get around the Lake (but I went around the Lake 2 weeks ago....that water is just too cold now and the extra 80 or so nm of routing was well worth it). And, I've flown Sidney NS to St.Pierre, about 100 nm over water, in summer with a raft. So, overwater isn't a problem always in my risk analysis (others may differ even with those choices).

    Anyway, an interesting route choice for what advantage I'm not quite sure.

  • #2
    This is the one that I was mentioning this afternoon, Andy A....

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    • #3
      Certainly doesn't make much sense to fly that route in that aircraft.

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      • #4
        I've crossed Lake Michigan more than 200 times in a single. Usually 11-12,000 feet.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Gil Buettner View Post
          I've crossed Lake Michigan more than 200 times in a single. Usually 11-12,000 feet.
          Gil - When the water is 46 degrees and it's shorter to go over land only? Just checkin'....

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          • #6
            Just being a devil's advocate, how many of us have had a cruise flight engine failure?

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            • #7
              All it takes is one :-)
              I’m cautious over water in a single, but have done it in my own plane which I knew was well maintained. I still planned close to shore when reasonable. Flew over the Gulf with raft and survival gear. I treated cold water with respect.

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              • #8
                When I was instructing at Palm beach International, sometimes they would extend the downwind until our 150 was offshore. If it got too far, I would advise that we had no flotation devices on board., half as a joke, but it got the message across.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
                  Just being a devil's advocate, how many of us have had a cruise flight engine failure?
                  Terry -- I had a partial (most) engine failure in a single at cruise in IMC. Pretty much right over SGJ at 14,000' (or 15,000', can't recall).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
                    Just being a devil's advocate, how many of us have had a cruise flight engine failure?
                    It was in a twin... King air B200 at FL290, broken compressor turbine wheel... Whump, then Whoooosh. about a 2 second event... ( it was on a NASCAR trip... so once all was in order I made a PA, "We done blowed up"..)

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                    • #11
                      Not quite cruise for our P-Baron, but late in the climb to FL 180 for my partner on new engines.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jeff Hartmann View Post

                        It was in a twin... King air B200 at FL290, broken compressor turbine wheel... Whump, then Whoooosh. about a 2 second event... ( it was on a NASCAR trip... so once all was in order I made a PA, "We done blowed up"..)
                        Oh, that reminds me if we're including piston twins.....yes, one complete power loss on one side at cruise.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
                          Just being a devil's advocate, how many of us have had a cruise flight engine failure?
                          Hi Terry,

                          3X, 3 different Cessna TU-206 aircraft:

                          1) At about 1,500’ climbing straight out’a KBOW rwy 23. Swallowed an exhaust valve. Lowered da nose and hung a 180. Squoke it in on rwy 5. Had yet to read and assimilate the teachings of JD as to proper leaning protocol.

                          2) Departed KISM. Passing 9,000’ on the way to 18,000’. Throttle cable broke at the fuel control unit. Engine went to idle. Landed in a cow pasture on the "Lucky L Ranch."

                          3) Departed KISM east bound. Held to 1,500 by ATC. Turbocharger seized due to lack of lubrication. Engine too rich to run and too low to monkey with stuff in the cockpit. Landed on the raised dike running parallel to a canal.

                          Ain’t bent no metal . . . yet . . . But as a geezer I’m still try’n <g>.

                          Regards,
                          Tom Charlton
                          "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gil Buettner View Post
                            I've crossed Lake Michigan more than 200 times in a single. Usually 11-12,000 feet.
                            Gilmore, duz that altitude make you feel better? All I ever worried 'bout was the last 50 feet or so.

                            best, randy

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                            • #15
                              But no forced landing from CRUISE flight.

                              Several from departure or climb. A few of one engine in a twin.

                              Was just wondering.

                              I had a stuck valve in a C-172 coming out of first flight. It was still flying, so I started to come around to land, when it unstuck. So continued home, but stayed gliding distance from airstrips all the way.

                              And sucked a cattle egret through an A-10 engine right after rotation. Lost a little bit of fan speed, but uneventful landing.

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