Ugliest planes?

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  • #16
    From Stephan Wilkinson this morning:

    ” Hey, Tom, I'm in Cornwall-on-Hudson, just up the Hudson River from West Point, and I spend most of my I'm-NOT-retired time writing for Aviation History, Military History and Military History Quarterly magazines. I'm also active in our local chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, which operates several youth flying programs--we have our own 172--and is probably the most active and productive of the 55 Tuskegee Airmen chapters in the country. “
    Tom Tyson-A&P

    Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with fancy watches . . .
    ( . . . and Mechanics without Pilots are Unemployed.)

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    • #17
      Very nice.

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      • #18
        Tell him to come join us here and in Duluth.

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        • #19
          I went to High School in Cornwall on Hudson...(just my senior year..)

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          • #20
            Not to veer off too far, but I always loved the Falco, and the SF26 both designed by Stelio Frati…

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Jeff Hartmann View Post
              Not to veer off too far, but I always loved the Falco, and the SF26 both designed by Stelio Frati…
              Agreed.

              And to think, in Italy, at one time you could buy a Falco. At the same time, in the US, you could buy a Tri Pacer.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post

                At the same time, in the US, you could buy a Tri Pacer.
                Good grief, "tiempo fugit"! I can well recall when I was in USAF cadets learning to fly B-25s at REE. Roy Neal at West-Tex Aircraft in LBB muny was selling PA-20s, then came the "milkstools". IIRC, the first were 125s, then came the 135s, then 150 and final ones were 160. Then came the PA-24s.

                best, randy

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                • #23
                  And at that time, this is what the Italians were building and flying -
                  Attached Files

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                  • #24
                    Randy, I remember when the Tri-Pacers had a string of crashes...the fabric would rip along the top of the windshield, peel all the way back, and wrap around the tail. Seems there was an AD on that.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Ralph Jones View Post
                      Randy, I remember when the Tri-Pacers had a string of crashes...the fabric would rip along the top of the windshield, peel all the way back, and wrap around the tail. Seems there was an AD on that.
                      Ya'know, couldn't recall that deal but I'll try to see if there's still an AD Note on the PA-22s that I can read, thanks.

                      Still recall a few guys at LBB that'd flown a "milkstool" (PA-22) and thought, repeat, thought, that that they could fly a PA-20. Chuckle!

                      best, randy

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                      • #26
                        AD 74-17-04 PIPER: Amendment 39-1919 as amended by Amendment 39-2154 is further amended by Amendment 39-2865. Applies to the following Models which are covered with cotton or linen at the critical area on top of the windshield where the fabric attaches to the channel: PA-12, Serial Numbers 12-2904 and higher, except 12-2907, 12-2911, 12-2914, 12-2915, 12-2917, 12-2925, 12-2950, 12-3028-S and 12-3901 through 12-3903; PA-14; PA-15; PA-16; PA-17; PA-20; and PA-22 airplanes, Serial Numbers 22-1 and up, certificated in all categories.

                        To prevent sudden failure of the fabric at the top of the windshield where the fabric attaches to the channel, accomplish the following:

                        1. For all airplanes, unless already accomplished, the indicated Piper Kits or equivalent parts approved by the Chief, Engineering and Manufacturing Branch, FAA, Eastern Region, must be installed within the next 25 hours in service after the effective date of this AD on airplanes which have fabric exceeding three years since installation:

                        (a) Kit 760 799 effective on: PA-12, Serial numbers 12-2904 and higher, except 12-2907, 12-2911, 12-2914, 12-2915, 12-2917, 12-2925, 12-2950, 12-3028-S and 12-3901 through 12-3903; all PA-12S and PA-14 airplanes.

                        (b) Kit 754 404 effective on: All PA-15, PA-16, PA-17 and PA-20 and PA-22 Airplane Serial Numbers 22-1 and up.

                        2. For all airplanes at every 100 hours in service after accomplishment of 1(a) or 1(b), remove the metallic strip and inspect the fabric over the top surface.

                        (a) If no cracks or fraying are found, reinstall the metallic strip.

                        (b) If any cracks or fraying are found, prior to further flight, add a fabric reinforcement strip (pinked-tape) starting from a line formed by the intersection of the windshield and the leading edge of the channel and extending aft at least three inches from the trailing edge of the channel. Reinstall the metallic strip.

                        3. For all airplanes which have fabric installed within the last three years, every 100 hours in service after the effective date of this AD, until three years are accumulated, inspect the fabric over the top surface.

                        If any cracks or fraying are found, prior to further flight, install Piper Kits or equivalent parts approved by the Chief, Engineering and Manufacturing Branch, FAA, Eastern Region, as in 1(a) or 1(b) as appropriate.

                        Upon request and appropriate substantiating data submitted through an FAA maintenance inspector, the compliance time specified in this AD may be increased by the Chief, Engineering and Manufacturing Branch, FAA, Eastern Region.

                        Piper Service Letter No. 362A pertains to this subject.

                        This AD supersedes AD 61-06-06.

                        Amendment 39-1919 was effective August 16, 1974.

                        Amendment 39-2154 was effective April 9, 1975.

                        This amendment 39-2865 is effective April 11, 1977.

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                        • #27
                          When I was a Line Boy, there was a PA-22 "Caribbean" on our field (CDW), it had a 160 HP engine and took 100/130. Unlike the others using 80/87.

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                          • #28
                            Geesh, amendment to the amendment to the amendment, etc. Top-fight gooberment type communication for sure.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Jeff Hartmann View Post
                              When I was a Line Boy, there was a PA-22 "Caribbean" on our field (CDW), it had a 160 HP engine and took 100/130. Unlike the others using 80/87.
                              Yup, can recall that that 160 horse Lycoming took the higher ocnae fuel. IIR, the "Caribbean " was cheaper version of them.

                              best, randy

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Dave Siciliano View Post
                                Geesh, amendment to the amendment to the amendment, etc. Top-fight gooberment type communication for sure.
                                Yup, can dimly remember Earl Horton writing in some logbooks that it'd been complied with on that airframe.

                                best, randy

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