Best Glide and Min Sink

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  • Best Glide and Min Sink

    Before you start a discussion about Engine Failures and things in that vein there are two speeds that you need to know... in my opinion. Best Glide (usually comes from the manufacturer and Minimum Sink. We need to figure out what Min Sink is for your airplane. This video uses the A36 Bonanza:

    gunny

  • #2
    A number of aircraft I have flown have published minimum sink speeds.

    2-33, 1-26, 1-36, Grob 102, Grob 103.

    Of course, none of them have an engine.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post

      Of course, none of them have an engine
      Chuckle - you beat me to sayin' that!

      best, randy

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      • #4
        I've found a lot of pilots that don't know what minimum sink is or have ever thought about it's use. When flying over open water, where it's clear one can't reach anything helpful, I'd use that and wear out the radio making sure someone knew where I was :-)

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        • #5
          In the Navy, it was called max endurance. As Gunny said, it's 1.4 Vso. Very useful around the boat when the deck goes foul and there's no bingo and you have to hang around for awhile. A reminder; like all things aviation, it's AOA dependent, not airspeed dependent, but in the case of GA airplanes, a single airspeed will get you close enough.

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          • #6
            Nice video from Gunny. VB is both indexed on my PFD and I have it set in my autopilot (DFC-90) so if all goes seriously south I hit “IAS” and it will hold that while I try to extinguish the helmet fire between my ears. I’ll work on Min Sink speed skills next, Thanks for posting.

            Best,
            Andy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bruce Gorrell View Post
              In the Navy, it was called max endurance. As Gunny said, it's 1.4 Vso. Very useful around the boat when the deck goes foul and there's no bingo and you have to hang around for awhile. A reminder; like all things aviation, it's AOA dependent, not airspeed dependent, but in the case of GA airplanes, a single airspeed will get you close enough.
              At least in the T-38 and A-10, it was marked by a triangle on the AOA gauge.

              I used it on my solo night flight in a T-38. I managed a 1.6, which is a T-38 is a LONG flight.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Scott Perdue (50F) View Post
                . . . discussion about Engine Failures and things in that vein . . .
                Hi Gunny,
                Like what you’re doing here. You’n I could sit and hangar fly for hours about engine out thinking. Three forced landings in three different Cessna TU-206 aircraft during my flying career. No bent metal yet. It’s a subject near and dear to me<grin>.

                Regards,
                Tom Charlton



                "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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                • #9
                  Thanks ya'll. I've had trouble logging in for awhile. Mike Overly fixed me up. Working on the next video. Maybe we need a meet up at Oshkosh this year! Thanks for watching!

                  gunny

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