New Glider Altitude Record

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  • New Glider Altitude Record

    The Perlan 2, an experimental glider, has set a world record for high-altitude flight. It reached 76,100 feet over the El Calafate region in Argentina.
    Hate is a self-built dungeon in which a man imprisons his own soul.

  • #2
    And I thought I did a good one with 32,000...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ray Tackett View Post
      76,100 feet
      "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ralph Jones View Post
        And I thought I did a good one with 32,000...
        "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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        • #5
          One of my Army buddies talks about high altitude mapping using a Mohawk.
          I Earned my Spurs in Vietnam
          48th AHC 1971-72

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          • #6
            I read about the previous record and this one. The glider is actually pressurized.

            And they did a tow up to 40K. So, while very high, not so much altitude gain.

            My best was 18,000 in WV in a Grob 102.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
              My best was.
              Wow, just readin' here and am jsut amazed, we had a Schwiezer (spellling?) 1-23 at Lubbock/Hobbs and thought I was lucky to be able to fly it a few times.

              best, randy

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Randy Sohn View Post
                Schwiezer (spellling?) 1-23
                Schweizer. German fiberglass squeezed them out of the glider market a while back and they're a helicopter company now, though there are a lot of their products still flying. Their 2-32 had a wide back seat that could hold two people, and most of that fleet got bought up by a tourist-ride chain.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
                  The glider is actually pressurized.
                  http://perlanproject.org/

                  And they did a tow up to 40K. So, while very high, not so much altitude gain.
                  able to continue on up!

                  My best was 18,000 in WV in a Grob 102.
                  "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ralph Jones View Post
                    Schweizer. German fiberglass squeezed them out of the glider market a while back and they're a helicopter company now, though there are a lot of their products still flying. Their 2-32 had a wide back seat that could hold two people, and most of that fleet got bought up by a tourist-ride chain.
                    And how many people got their primary training in a 2-33, or the predecessor, the 2-22, also known as the Brick. ]

                    And the 1-26 is still a well patronized one design class.

                    I have time in 2-33, 1-26, and 1-36.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tom Charlton View Post
                      The old "coffin corner" where Vne (TAS) comes to meet Stall speed (IAS).

                      No, the used a tow plane to 40K, not the wave. In that region, the bottom of the wave could be well into the upper 20s, low 30s.

                      Even more impressive, I did a 1+10 in a 2-33 in thermals just west of San Antonio.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post

                        And how many people got their primary training in a 2-33, or the predecessor, the 2-22, also known as the Brick. ]

                        And the 1-26 is still a well patronized one design class.

                        I have time in 2-33, 1-26, and 1-36.
                        Soloed in 2-22, 2-33 & 1-26 on 3/24/1966.
                        Tom Tyson-A&P

                        Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with fancy watches . . .
                        ( . . . and Mechanics without Pilots are Unemployed.)

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                        • #13
                          Good to see that many avsiggers have sailplane experience in their past.
                          Hard to pinpoint exactly any one thing about that background that forever makes you a better pilot, but better pilot you are.

                          Regards,
                          Tom Charlton

                          "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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                          • #14
                            Hard to pinpoint exactly any one thing about that background that forever makes you a better pilot, but better pilot you are.
                            How about stick-and-rudder skills and a solid feel for energy management? I got mine in wood-and-fabric taildraggers without flaps. Aerobatics in a Stearman were a big part of it for me. Cubs on wheels and skis did a lot, too.

                            Lotsa "systems operators" with pilot certificates these automated, glass cockpit days.

                            (My glider time is one ride.)
                            Hate is a self-built dungeon in which a man imprisons his own soul.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ray Tackett View Post
                              How about stick-and-rudder skills and a solid feel for energy management? I got mine in wood-and-fabric taildraggers without flaps. Aerobatics in a Stearman were a big part of it for me. Cubs on wheels and skis did a lot, too.
                              Lotsa "systems operators" with pilot certificates these automated, glass cockpit days.
                              "The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

                              Comment

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