Unnecessary OverWater

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  • Scott Dyer HPN/NY
    started a topic Unnecessary OverWater

    Unnecessary OverWater

    Sitting and paying bills today at the computer (;-( ), I was watching traffic in and out of HPN on a rather bumpy but 6-800 foot ceiling kind of day. The heavy rain of earlier has cleared out, no peals of thunder since about 7:30AM.

    What caught my eye was a light single taking the so-called Shark Route (V139) from SIE VOR in southern NJ off the Atlantic coast to RICED (nearing the HTO VOR on Eastern Long Island), as a way to get to HPN. It did this at 9,000' - 7,000', I assume rather than flying at 5,000' up V1 to DIXIE, then V276 RBV V249 SAX V39 DIXIE (the west route over land).

    Seems an odd choice....the overland route is 25 nm (12% shorter) (200 nm versus 175 nm), and there wasn't any wx in the way (it had to fly through moderate rain on the over water route). And, the water temperature at a buoy near the off-shore route is 48.4dF.

    Maybe the a/c is outfitted with a raft, I don't know. And, I'll do over Lake Michigan in the summer at 16,000' or so, limiting being out of gliding distance to about 10 mins., rather than go south of Chicago to get around the Lake (but I went around the Lake 2 weeks ago....that water is just too cold now and the extra 80 or so nm of routing was well worth it). And, I've flown Sidney NS to St.Pierre, about 100 nm over water, in summer with a raft. So, overwater isn't a problem always in my risk analysis (others may differ even with those choices).

    Anyway, an interesting route choice for what advantage I'm not quite sure.

  • Bill Bridges
    replied
    Originally posted by Gil Buettner View Post
    Had to shut down an engine about 200 miles out over the Atlantic at night because of a fire warning. We immediately did a 180 and were losing altitude. The other three got us back to Langley where we learned the problem was a defective fire warning system. But we had emptied two bottles of extinguisher into that engine, so it wasn't going to run again for a while.
    In SE Asia we would get a Fire Warning from time to time in the UH-1s. Normally it was a false alarm caused by the heat from that tropical paradise. We were so jaded that every time we would get a Fire Alarm we'd have the CE lean out and check to see if we were burning.

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  • Gil Buettner
    replied
    Had to shut down an engine about 200 miles out over the Atlantic at night because of a fire warning. We immediately did a 180 and were losing altitude. The other three got us back to Langley where we learned the problem was a defective fire warning system. But we had emptied two bottles of extinguisher into that engine, so it wasn't going to run again for a while.

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  • Scott Dyer HPN/NY
    replied
    Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
    Do tell?
    I'm pretty sure Steph is referring to her engine out landing at Kingston/Ulster (20N), a nasty little field for that type of activity. She described it on Avsig at the time, and I shake my head whenever I fly over that field.

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  • Terry Carraway
    replied
    Do tell?

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  • Stephanie Belser
    replied
    Originally posted by Terry Carraway View Post
    Just being a devil's advocate, how many of us have had a cruise flight engine failure?
    *raises hand*

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  • Randy Sohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom Charlton View Post
    read and assimilate the teachings of JD
    Thomasina, sure was great to see someone here mention John!

    best, randy

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  • Randy Sohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Gil Buettner View Post

    used to cross the Big Pond at 9000 eastbound and 10,000 going west
    Yup - chuckle!

    best, randy (a "Buc-buc-buhgwhhhaackkkkk" squawk from the chicken here)

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  • Randy Sohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Bridges View Post
    Never been to Wake
    First time I ever went into Wake was when I was flying as CP on a VC-54D (one of the VIP bitds we had at Offutt AFB at Omaha), been try'n to recall if that was where that shipwreckage was just off-shore?

    best, randy

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  • Gil Buettner
    replied
    Originally posted by Randy Sohn View Post

    Gilmore, duz that altitude make you feel better? All I ever worried 'bout was the last 50 feet or so.

    best, randy
    Sorry for the tardy reply - I haven't been here much lately.

    I used to cross the Big Pond at 9000 eastbound and 10,000 going west, until a guy in a Cessna lost his engine mid-lake and went in about four miles offshore from Ludington. Pilot lived, three pax perished. So I started adding altitude.

    Depending on wind, I figured there was probably 10 minutes or so when I could not make shore if the engine quit. To answer Scott, going around really did add a lot of time, and I had a well-maintained, relatively fast Bonanza, and carried a raft and wore a flotation device. Yes, I know that survival was questionable. I once asked a Coast Guard pilot how long it would take from Traverse City to look for me in the middle of the lake, and I didn't like the answer.

    Now that I am older, I find I have a lot more time to go places. Mostly now I take the Badger car ferry or drive around.

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  • Randy Sohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Bridges View Post

    On one of the trips we also stopped at Kwaj. Never been to Wake. I did Kadena, Anderson and Subic also. All in the mighty B707-323C, one of my favorite airplanes.
    Chuckle, chuckle, sounds like one of those MAC/MATS jet powered contractors. All we had in the MN ANG were those ex-Travis AFB (Pacific Division) C-97A's, sure concur with the comment - lotta water out there crossing the oceans. Still recall the comment/story about Wake Island and the shark "Mag Check Charlie". He'd lie in the water off the end of the ruway there and listen for a rough engine and then, if he heard a questionable one, quick swim around to the water off the departure end of the runway and wait for the ditching!

    best, randy

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  • Bill Bridges
    replied
    Originally posted by Larry sreyoB View Post
    I did the KSSU-PHIK trip once in the DC8. From HIK, we did a few trips to Kwaj and Wake before returning. Lots of ocean out there...

    On one of the trips we also stopped at Kwaj. Never been to Wake. I did Kadena, Anderson and Subic also. All in the mighty B707-323C, one of my favorite airplanes.

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  • Larry sreyoB
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Bridges View Post
    I made a couple of those KSUU to PHIK trips enroute to that tropical paradise in SE Asia. ROFL
    I did the KSSU-PHIK trip once in the DC8. From HIK, we did a few trips to Kwaj and Wake before returning. Lots of ocean out there...


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  • Bill Bridges
    replied
    Originally posted by Randy Sohn View Post

    Likewise, try'na think now if there was another one or so? Boeing C-97, just past ETP between Honolulu (Hickham)and San Fran (Travis).

    best, randy
    I made a couple of those KSUU to PHIK trips enroute to that tropical paradise in SE Asia. ROFL

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  • Randy Sohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Larry sreyoB View Post
    My ........(Not a very dramatic story, I'm afraid)
    Likewise, try'na think now if there was another one or so? Boeing C-97, just past ETP between Honolulu (Hickham)and San Fran (Travis).

    best, randy

    Leave a comment:

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